lastmimzy:

The cat’s like WHAT THE FUCK DID YOU BRING HOME

(via please-notforever)

bout to get me some sweet mario party 8 action on ebay

hopefully

travisbeacham:

"Tiger, tiger, burning bright…"

travisbeacham:

"Tiger, tiger, burning bright…"

youngstero:

little red riding hood is so dumb if i went to my grandma’s house and she was a wolf i wouldnt ask a bunch of questions about her new appearance id straight up be like “um gran are you a wolf?”

{inspiration | michael | ray |gavinryanjackgeoff}

{inspiration | michael | ray | gavin | ryanjackgeoff}

(via danathemadking)

  • me: *looks over field* we only get 6, 7 notes most of the time
  • me: *single tear* but we're honest prairie bloggers, same as anyone else
Mathematics, though utterly useless for most careers and completely devoid of moral content, is an excellent example of a subject fit for humanist education. It’s hard enough that most children can’t enjoy it on their own, but it’s a source of wonder for any student who’s lucky enough to have a Frizzle-y enough teacher. The same goes, I think, for literature: we teach Chaucer in liberal-arts high schools because it’s a work of great beauty and fun. But it’s also high-hanging fruit, which means that most students can’t pluck it without help. A life with Chaucer might be no different than one without. Or it might be warped into a completely new shape. The only way to find out, of course, is to be taught Chaucer.

What if we utterly threw out the window the idea of math as useful and focused on it as wonderful?

http://besidesmuchcattle.blogspot.com/2014/08/in-renaissance-for-instance.html

(via allofthemath)

(via bewbin)